This week, Microsoft will hold its annual MIX conference in Las Vegas, and while the show isn't as big as, say, CES--heck, it's got less hype than an Apple press conference--it's a big deal for the software giant and its customers. That's because this MIX is a bit different than past shows. In addition to the normal web developer focus, MIX'10 will also focus on Windows Phone 7 and, less specifically, on Microsoft's efforts to bridge the gaps between the PC, web, and phone.
MIX promises, among other things, to provide new information about...
Internet Explorer 9. Microsoft gave a very early look at its next web browser last fall at the Windows 7 launch, but developers this week can expect a closer look at what the company will be focused on for this release. And make no mistake about the audience here: Any IE 9 information we receive this week will be targeted at developers, not the general public.
Windows Phone 7. Last month, Microsoft revealed that it was abandoning Windows Mobile and developing a completely new mobile platform called Windows Phone 7. This week at MIX, we'll get a better look at what the developer picture is for this platform. This will involve Silverlight for traditional applications and XNA for games.
Silverlight. Speaking of Silverlight, while the advent of HTML 5 and other next-generation web technologies could one day cause the end of browser plug-ins like this (and Flash), Microsoft is quickly advancing this .NET-based runtime environment with additional capabilities and support for a while range of PC and mobile systems. Expect an update on Silverlight 4 at the show.
Expression. Microsoft's Express suite targets standards-based web developers, designers, and anyone else that's working on content-rich web sites. In tandem with Visual Studio 2010, Microsoft will be revving these products to take advantage of the next generation platforms and technologies listed above.
I'll be covering the show live from Las Vegas, and will be live blogging the Monday and Tuesday morning keynotes with bloggers Ed Bott (ZDNet), Mary Jo Foley (ZDNet), Long Zheng (I Started Something) Ben Rubenstein (Neowin), and Kip Kniskern (LiveSide). Stay tuned to the SuperSite for Windows for all of my MIX'10 coverage.
http://www.winsupersite.com

This week, Microsoft will hold its annual MIX conference in Las Vegas, and while the show isn't as big as, say, CES—heck, it's got less hype than an Apple press conference—it's a big deal for the software giant and its customers. That's because this MIX is a bit different than past shows. In addition to the normal web developer focus, MIX'10 will also focus on Windows Phone 7 and, less specifically, on Microsoft's efforts to bridge the gaps between the PC, web, and phone.

MIX promises, among other things, to provide new information about...

Internet Explorer 9. Microsoft gave a very early look at its next web browser last fall at the Windows 7 launch, but developers this week can expect a closer look at what the company will be focused on for this release. And make no mistake about the audience: Any IE 9 information we receive this week will be targeted at developers, not the general public.

Windows Phone 7. Last month, Microsoft revealed that it was abandoning Windows Mobile and developing a completely new mobile platform called Windows Phone 7. This week at MIX, we'll get a better look at what the developer picture is for this platform. This will involve Silverlight for traditional applications and XNA for games.

Silverlight. Speaking of Silverlight, although the advent of HTML 5 and other next-generation web technologies could one day cause the end of browser plug-ins like this (and Flash), Microsoft is quickly advancing this .NET-based runtime environment with additional capabilities and support for a wide range of PC and mobile systems. Expect an update on Silverlight 4 at the show.

Expression. Microsoft's Express suite targets standards-based web developers, designers, and anyone else working on content-rich websites. In tandem with Visual Studio 2010, Microsoft will be revving these products to take advantage of the next-generation platforms and technologies listed above.

I'll be covering the show live from Las Vegas, and will be live blogging the Monday and Tuesday morning keynotes with bloggers Ed Bott (ZDNet), Mary Jo Foley (ZDNet), Long Zheng (I Started Something) Ben Rubenstein (Neowin), and Kip Kniskern (LiveSide). Stay tuned to the SuperSite for Windows for all of my MIX'10 coverage.