A. An easy way to check if you're sending 9kB packets instead of the 1.5kB standard is to use the ping command. Use a data size of 8kB bytes along with the no-fragment switch.

ping <server> -f -l 8000

As can be seen in my example below, I can successfully use jumbo frames to talk to savdalvs02, but not to savdalwks01. If I reduce the packet size to 800B, it works just fine for non-jumbo frame hosts.

If I use the command

ping savdalvs02 -f -l 8000
I'll see
Pinging savdalvs02.savilltech.net \[192.168.1.31\] with 8000 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.31: bytes=8000 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.31: bytes=8000 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.31: bytes=8000 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.31: bytes=8000 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.31:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

But if I enter

ping savdaldc10 -f -l 8000

I'll see

Pinging savdaldc10.savilltech.net \[192.168.1.10\] with 8000 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.10:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

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