According to a Microsoft job posting that was originally reported by MobileTechWorld, Microsoft plans to release one major update to its Windows Phone OS each year. The company is also attempting to bolster its Windows Phone marketing efforts if a related job posting is to be believed. Yep, we're stooping to reading Microsoft job postings for information now.

"The Application Platform team ... is working on major yearly releases [for Windows Phone]," the first job posting reads. "This Senior Program Manager position will be the [one] that drives all development work on the Application Platform for update releases between major yearly releases."

So that's pretty clear-cut: major yearly releases with some unknown number of update releases between each. This maps to what Microsoft has done during the first year of Windows Phone's lifetime, and appears to be the plan going forward as well.

As for marketing, the Windows Phone team has its work cut out for it. Despite being a hugely innovative platform with major usage advantages over the more popular Android and iPhone devices with which it competes, Windows Phone has thus far languished in the market. But a second job posting mentions IDC predictions of future Windows Phone successes as a lure for new marketing talent.

"By 2015, IDC expects Windows Phone to be the number-two operating system worldwide behind Android," the job posting notes. "With the launch of Windows Phone 7, our newly established global partnership with Nokia, and the upcoming 'Mango' release, there has never been a more exciting time to be in the global Windows Phone Marketing business group than right now."

The posting continues: "The Developer & Marketplace team is looking for a senior marketing leader to develop and execute our global co-marketing strategy with top app publisher. The job [is to] define and land the Windows Phone co-marketing strategy and plan for leading app publishers worldwide."

In related news, Goldman Sachs says it's "surprised by the extent to which Windows Phone is gaining momentum." The comment came in a report in which the firm cut its price target on Research In Motion (RIM)'s stock price due to the "rapidly deteriorating business metric" of its BlackBerry business.