Microprocessor maker AMD recently plugged the final 64-bit hole in its line of microprocessors by releasing a dual-core version of the 64-bit Turion processor for mobile PCs. AMD now offers 64-bit dual-core microprocessors for server, desktop, and mobile computers, a feat that even Intel has yet to accomplish. AMD also shipped a new version of its Athlon 64 desktop processor, which includes a new socket connector, support for faster Double Data Rate 2 (DDR2) memory, and AMD's Virtualization technology.

"AMD is first to market with the only 64-bit dual-core mobile processor, driving the wave of next-generation mobile platforms that are ready today to run the upcoming 64-bit version of Microsoft Windows Vista," says AMD Vice President Chris Cloran. "This is advanced mobile technology for the office or home, packing dual-core processing for extreme multitasking, 64-bit computing, extended battery life, and cutting-edge technology from industry leaders in wireless, connectivity, and graphics."

The AMD Turion 64 X2 processor line utilizes the same Direct Connect Architecture and high-speed links between processor cores, system memory, and the I/O bus that have given AMD's desktop and processor chips a huge advantage over Intel's processors. Intel offers dual-core microprocessors for mobile systems, but they're 32-bit, not 64-bit designs.

This week, AMD also delivered its fastest desktop processors yet, the AMD Athlon 64 FX-62 and Athlon 64 X2 5000+ dual processor. These chips utilize AMD's new AM2 socket technology, high-speed DDR2 memory, and AMD Virtualization technology (previously code-named Pacifica). The company will also update its server-based Opteron chips later this year to support DDR2 and AMD Virtualization.