To coincide with our June redesign of Windows IT Pro, we’ve revamped our back page! Don’t worry! It will still contain a lot of the humor you’re accustomed to, including funny screenshots and poignant end-user moments. But the new incarnation will have lots more for you. Here’s a sneak preview of the type of stuff our new back page will contain: a systems administrator’s list of IT tips. Enjoy!

10) Talk in tech code—When conferring with a fellow technician within earshot of your users, always say you have an “ID:10-T” error (tech code for “idiot”).

9) VPN stands for “Very Particular Network”—Some things, such as software deployment and other administrative tasks, don't work very well through a long, skinny pipe.

8) A server rack isn’t a desk—Every ounce of coffee you spill equals one U of server it will pass through.

7) Be nice to your wife—Test your upgrades and come up with at least three ways to restore production data so you won't have to spend all weekend explaining to your wife, "I really am working, dear. Honestly!"

6) Log files aren’t necessarily just log files—They could be transaction log files, and moving them to another disk to make more room isn’t a good idea.

5) "Ready, Fire, Aim" is never a good method of project deployment—SCUBA divers are meticulous about having a plan before they jump into the water. Failure to do otherwise can result in the bends or even death. So, when performing a network or server upgrade, remember to heed the diver’s motto: "Plan your Dive, Dive your Plan."

4) Don't change something that you can't do without unless you have a "Get Out of Jail Free Card"—Something's bound to go wrong. When it does, make sure you can get back to square 1 (and save your job).

3) Users don't lie; the truth changes—When trying to troubleshoot a problem, you might have to ask the same question several ways to get at the root of the problem.

2) Cables move; don't trust the label—Trace and retrace before you accidentally bring down the network.

1) When in doubt, blame the guy who left!—Why take responsibility for your mistakes when you can just blame the guy who went to the company next door and is now making $20,000 more than you?

Do you have any tips you'd like to share