Intel Corporation introduced the Celeron and 350 and 400 MHz Pentium II computers on Wednesday, ushering in a new era of Pentium II computing. The Celeron will replace Pentium and Pentium MMX systems on the low-end, offering up a 266 MHz Pentium II-based microprocessor with no L2 cache. The Pentium II 350 and 400, meanwhile, extend the high-end of PC computing with the fastest processors now available from the company and a new, high-speed 100 MHz system bus.

And, yes, I already bought a 400 MHz system.

"We introduced Celeron so that we could have a business at that price point," said Kea Grilley, director of Pentium II programs at Intel. "But we are trying to show businesses how they can be more efficient with the high-end processors, with things like virus scan and encryption/decryption going on in the background while users continue to work."

Compaq, Hewlett-Packard, Dell, and IBM have all committed to supported the little-loved Celeron, while numerous other companies will also be releasing systems based on the high-end chip