In Windows XP, Microsoft has included a game that will be all too familiar to Windows systems administrators and users. The game is "Where do I find the tool that I could easily find in the previous OS?" Here are the top 10 administrative tools and tasks that have new homes in XP, along with directions for where to find them.

10. My Computer—When you first log on to a new installation of XP, you'll notice that most of your handy desktop icons are gone. You'll now find the My Computer folder at Start, Control Panel, My Computer. If you're so inclined, you can drag My Computer to your desktop and create a floating toolbar.

9. My Network Places—On a new installation of XP, you'll find My Network Places by accessing Start, My Computer, then right-clicking My Network Places and selecting Explore. After you open a file on a network share, however, My Network Places automatically appears at the Start menu's top level.

8. Creating users and groups—Believe it or not, some tools are easier to find in XP than they are in Windows 2000; User Manager is one example. In Win2K, you access User Manager in Start, Settings, Control Panel, Users and Passwords. In XP, you select Start, Control Panel, User Accounts.

7. Setting up printers—Adding printers is another task that you can accomplish more easily in XP. In Win2K, you access Start, Settings, Printers, Add Printer to add a printer. In XP, your new route is Start, Control Panel, Printers and Other Hardware, Add a printer.

6. Viewing the event logs—The event logs are still components of the Administrative Tools menu, but your route to that menu is different in XP. In Win2K, you access event logs at Start, Settings, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Event Viewer. In XP, you access them at Start, Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance, Administrative Tools, Event Viewer.

5. Creating data sources—To create ODBC data sources, with which you can connect your system to Microsoft SQL Server and other databases, you must follow a new path. In Win2K, you access the ODBC Administrator at Start, Settings, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Data Sources. In XP, the tool resides at Start, Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance, Administrative Tools, Data Sources.

4. Controlling services—In XP, the options to control services reside in the Administrative Tools folder, so you click Start, Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance, Administrative Tools, Services. In Win2K, you manage services under Start, Settings, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Services.

3. Internet options—To configure your Internet options in Win2K, you need to use Microsoft Internet Explorer's (IE's) Tools, Internet Options command. Although that option remains available in XP, you can bypass IE and instead use Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections, Internet Options.

2. Server Manager—Server Manager lets you view open files and connected users. In Win2K, you access Server Manager at Start, Settings, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Computer Management, Shared Folders. In XP, you go to Start, Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance, Administrative Tools, Computer Management, Shared Folders.

1. Configuring network protocols—The first task you'll need to accomplish after you get XP running is to configure your network. To get to Win2K's network configuration tool, you right-click My Network Places, select Properties to open the Network and Dial-up Connections window, right-click Local Area Connection, and select Properties. In XP, you go to Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections, Network Connections; right-click Local Area Connection; and select Properties.