I think this guy is saying something very important.

"I as a web developer HATE IE it takes the XHTML standards and throus them out the window, to make a web page 100% perfect in IE is to make a page that dose not follow any of the standards that govern all the other browsers out there"
 
This is a great example of "embrace, extend, make dysfunctional for others", and is a good case for where Microsoft goes off course. If they want to add something to SQL or something like the Negotiate protocol that extends IE authentication so that it can figure out what kind of NTLM or Kerberos authentication it can do, then fine as that doesn't intefere with anyone else. But in other cases it's not so clear cut and providing useful capability that is also a crippling feature for other browsers is not helpful, IMO to the greater good.

However, this should come full circle to the conversation about security, as that is where we began. And with that in mind, it is obvious that IE has big problems. When something like this continues to roll with security fix after fix - then it speaks to foundational issues in the software. Stuff that you can't really fix with patches cause the problem is in architecural issues made in the software and you can't patch a piece of software easily to complete rearchitect the design.

What we need from Microsoft a completely new browser, rebuilt from the ground up.

-brett hill
www.iistraining.com