If you want a second opinion about the reachability of the SRP host, you can use the BBSRPTEST utility. This command-line utility is located in the C:\Program Files\Research in Motion\BlackBerry Server\Utilities folder. When you run BBSRPTEST, it reads the RIM SRP host information from the registry and tries to connect to the SRP host. When the command finishes, you receive either a success message or a failure message. You can schedule an hourly batch task to pipe the output of BBSRPTEST to a text file and use the Find command or a script to check for the success message.

To turn BBSRPTEST into an automated monitoring solution, you would need to incorporate a notification method. For example, Listing A shows a simple batch file that runs BBSRPTEST and uses the Find command to look for the success notification. If Find doesn't locate the success message, it returns an errorlevel code of 1, which causes the batch file to run a VBScript that sends an email notification. (For more information about how to create a VBScript to send email, see “How to Send Rich Email Messages,” Instant Doc 37538.)

As I mentioned, the tool reads the SRP host information from the registry when you run the utility on the BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES). However, you can also run BBSRPTEST on another system. Doing so can be useful if you're trying to determine whether a problem lies with the BES server, the network, or a firewall by providing a second connection reference point. After copying the bbsrptest.exe file to another system, use the -host command-line switch to specify the name of the SRP host. The host name is one of three possible values—srp.na.blackberry.net, srp.eu.blackberry.net, or srp.ap.blackberry.net—depending on which part of the globe you live in: the Americas, Europe, or Asia. Make sure this system is permitted to talk to the SRP host over port 3101 on your firewall, or the test will always fail.