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September 27, 2002—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • Breaking Up Is (Not) Hard to Do

2. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Planning on Getting Certified? Make Sure to Pick Up Our New eBook!
  • Real-World Tips and Solutions Here for You

3. RESOURCES

  • Exchange XADM: Maximum Number of Storage Groups in Exchange 2000 for Database Capacity Planning
  • Featured Thread: Exchange 2000 SP3 Email Delivery Problem

4. NEW AND IMPROVED

  • Access Exchange from Your PDA or Phone
  • Submit Top Product Ideas

5. CONTACT US

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by Paul Robichaux, News Editor, exadmin@winnetmag.com)

  • BREAKING UP IS (NOT) HARD TO DO

  • A certain 1970s-era car commercial used to show a diamond cutter at work in the back seat of a moving car. The implication was clear: The car was steady enough to permit the precision that diamond cutting requires. Fortunately, you don't need to be a diamond cutter (or own a fancy car) to successfully break large Exchange Server Stores into smaller, more manageable chunks.

    When Microsoft designed Exchange Server 4.0, a large mail server might have several dozen users and tens of megabytes of data. However, the designers had the foresight to build a database structure that could handle much larger volumes of data. Exchange Server 5.5, Enterprise Edition (Exchange 5.5/E) introduced the "unlimited" Information Store (IS), which has no built-in size limit (although I've never seen a single IS larger than about 220GB). Until Exchange 2000 Server hit the streets, though, each IS was limited to one private store. This restriction made backing up and restoring large databases an adventure: Until you restored the entire IS, no one on the server could get mail. Considering the speed of tape-backup systems at the time that Microsoft released Exchange 5.5/E, this proposition was disheartening for administrators who wanted quick recovery of email data.

    Exchange 2000 addresses the problem by permitting as many as four storage groups (SGs) per server. Each SG can mount as many as five databases, and an SG contains the transaction logs for all its databases. Each database in an SG is independent of its peers, so dismounting or restoring a database affects only the mailboxes or public folders that the database contains. This change is a great boon to availability and simplifies backup management by letting you back up multiple SGs in parallel—slashing backup times in the process.

    The key to effectively splitting up your databases is to work backward. How long can you tolerate being without a particular database? (The answer depends on the service level agreement—SLA—that you have with your customers.) Microsoft's rule of thumb is that a restore takes twice as long as a backup. Halve the amount of time you can afford to be down; that interval represents your backup window. For example, if your SLA requires that your executive team's mailboxes never be offline for more than 8 hours in a row, you can't let your Store grow beyond a size that you can back up in 4 hours.

    Next, figure out exactly how much data you can back up within that window. The answer depends on the type of backup you perform (i.e., full, incremental, or differential), whether you back up to a locally attached or Storage Area Network (SAN) device, how many tape drives you have, and how fast your tape drives and backup software are.

    After you know how much data you can back up in the available time, you can estimate how big your Stores can get. For example, suppose that I want to be able to restore a database within a 1-hour window. I need to be able to back up that database within a 30-minute period. If I use a garden-variety tape subsystem, I can probably back up about 35GB per hour, so I shouldn't let my databases get much bigger than 18GB. I can enforce that restriction through mailbox limits or vigorous use of Mailbox Manager.

    You can use other methods to decide how to break up databases. A common tactic is to put the most important mailboxes in one database within an SG, then back up that SG more frequently. For bonus points, do the backups to disk (fairly feasible if you keep the number of critical mailboxes low), then push the backups to tape when time permits. That way, you get quick recovery of your most important mailboxes while keeping the backup size and media count manageable. (You're on your own deciding who's important enough to include in the special database.)


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    2. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • PLANNING ON GETTING CERTIFIED? MAKE SURE TO PICK UP OUR NEW EBOOK!

  • "The Insider's Guide to IT Certification" eBook is hot off the presses and contains everything you need to know to help you save time and money while preparing for certification exams from Microsoft, Cisco Systems, and CompTIA and have a successful career in IT. Get your copy of the Insider's Guide today!
    http://winnet.bookaisle.com/ebookcover.asp?ebookid=13475

  • REAL-WORLD TIPS AND SOLUTIONS HERE FOR YOU

  • Register online for Windows & .NET Magazine LIVE!. Network with the finest gathering of Windows gurus on the planet. This event is chock full of "been there, done that" knowledge from people who use Microsoft products in the real world. Early-bird discount expires soon. Register now and you'll also receive access to sessions of concurrently run XML and Web Services Connections.
    http://www.winnetmagLIVE.com

    3. RESOURCES

  • EXCHANGE XADM: MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STORAGE GROUPS IN EXCHANGE 2000 FOR DATABASE CAPACITY PLANNING

  • Each week, Microsoft posts several Exchange Server how-to articles to its Knowledge Base. This week, learn how to partition Exchange 2000 Server storage groups (SGs).
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;q251123

  • FEATURED THREAD: EXCHANGE 2000 SP3 EMAIL DELIVERY PROBLEM

  • PPDBlue just upgraded to Exchange 2000 Server Service Pack 3 (SP3), and now messages seem to be stuck in the SMTP queue awaiting "directory service lookup." To offer your advice or join the discussion, go to the following URL:
    http://www.winnetmag.com/forums/rd.cfm?cid=40&tid=46771

    4. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, products@winnetmag.com)

  • ACCESS EXCHANGE FROM YOUR PDA OR PHONE

  • Lee Derbyshire released OWA For PDA and OWA For WAP, applications that let you use your PDA or Wireless Application Protocol (WAP)-enabled phone to access your Exchange Server mailbox from any Internet connection. Outlook Web Access (OWA) is a collection of Web pages that you install on your Microsoft IIS server to let you access your Exchange Inbox from a Web browser. OWA For PDA lets you access address lists and distribution lists (DLs), create and access appointments, change your network password, and change your Out-of-Office message and status. OWA For WAP lets you read and send email messages and access all messages in all mailbox folders. OWA For PDA costs $75 per server and OWA For WAP costs $50 per server. Both applications support Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 5.5. For more information, contact Lee Derbyshire at email@leederbyshire.com.
    http://www.leederbyshire.com

  • SUBMIT TOP PRODUCT IDEAS

  • Have you used a product that changed your IT experience by saving you time or easing your daily burden? Do you know of a terrific product that others should know about? Tell us! We want to write about the product in a future Windows & .NET Magazine What's Hot column. Send your product suggestions to whatshot@winnetmag.com.

    5. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • ABOUT THE COMMENTARY — exadmin@winnetmag.com
    • ABOUT THE NEWSLETTER IN GENERAL — lpere@winnetmag.com

    (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)

    • TECHNICAL QUESTIONS — http://www.winnetmag.net/forums
    • PRODUCT NEWS — products@winnetmag.com
    • QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR EXCHANGE & OUTLOOK UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION?
      Customer Support — exchangeandoutlookupdate@winnetmag.com
    • WANT TO SPONSOR EXCHANGE & OUTLOOK UPDATE?
      emedia_opps@winnetmag.com

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