Exchange and Outlook UPDATE, Outlook Edition—brought to you by Exchange & Outlook Administrator, the print newsletter with practical advice, how-to articles, tips, and techniques to help you do your job today.
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(below COMMENTARY)


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November 26, 2002—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • Outlook Reminders

2. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Happy 10th Anniversary SQL Server!
  • Give Us Your Feedback and Be Entered to Win an Xbox

3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

  • EAS: Enhanced Storage Management for Exchange

4. RESOURCE

  • Tip: Message-Content Protection

5. NEW AND IMPROVED

  • Filter Spam Messages

6. CONTACT US

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by Sue Mosher, News Editor, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • OUTLOOK REMINDERS

  • How many times a day does Outlook remind you about a meeting or a task? Maybe you also receive reminders about email messages or contacts that you need to follow up on. Triggering alerts for a variety of different types of items is one of Outlook's key features. However, like almost any software feature, reminders have limitations and special settings that are worth exploring.

    The chief limitation of Outlook reminders is that they occur only for items in the Inbox, Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks folders in your default information store, whether that's an Exchange mailbox or a personal store (.pst) file. If you set a reminder on an item in any other folder — including an Exchange Server public folder — Outlook notifies you that it won't fire a reminder on the item.

    Slovak Technical Services' Extended Reminders tool, which you can purchase for $15 at http://www.slovaktech.com/extendedreminders.htm , triggers reminder alerts from mail, appointment, contact, and task items in any folder in the default store. It requires Outlook 2002 or Outlook 2000 in Corporate/Workgroup mode. With Extended Reminders, you can, for example, apply a flag to a message in your Sent Items folder to remind you to follow up if you don't get a response. Extended Reminders doesn't, however, fire reminders on public folders.

    If you use Outlook 2002 and exchange meeting requests with someone outside your Exchange organization who uses Outlook 2000, you need to be aware of an obscure interoperability problem related to appointment reminders. By default, Outlook 2002 uses the iCalendar standard to send a meeting request to Internet recipients. If the request includes a reminder, an Outlook 2000 recipient will see the raw iCalendar format instead of the Accept, Decline, and Tentative buttons associated with Outlook meeting requests. The solution is to omit the reminder from the meeting request.

    Some of the user settings related to reminders are easy to find in the Tools, Options dialog box. Others are a bit buried. On the Preferences tab, under Calendar, you can select the "Default reminder" box to automatically set a reminder on new appointments and designate how far in advance you want Outlook to send the reminder. Under Tasks, you can set the default time when a reminder will fire for a task due on a particular day. Unless you set a different time, Outlook will use the start of your workday as the default. You set the workday times in Tools, Options by clicking Calendar Options on the Preferences tab.

    The workday times also have an effect on the default reminder time for a message flag in Outlook 2000. The default reminder time for a message flag is the end of your workday. That doesn't make any sense to me, and unfortunately, you can't set the default message flag reminder time independently like you can the default task reminder time. Microsoft partially addresses this problem in Outlook 2002 by making midnight the default reminder time for message and contact flags. You can, however, set a different time for each message or contact flag to override the default.

    The biggest improvement in reminder handling in Outlook 2002 is the integrated Reminders window. In earlier versions, each reminder pops up its own message. If you come back from vacation to a lot of overdue tasks in Outlook 2000, you can spend quite a while clicking each reminder pop-up to dismiss it. In Outlook 2002, all reminders appear in a single window. You can select multiple reminders and dismiss them or "snooze" them for a certain amount of time. Or, if you really want to feel caught up, you can click the Dismiss All button.

    Although you can't change the default snooze period — it's always 5 minutes to start — Outlook will remember if you prefer a different amount of waiting time before the next reminder. For example, if you snooze a reminder for 2 hours, when that reminder appears 2 hours later and you're in the same Outlook session, Outlook will offer to snooze it for another 2 hours.

    You can, as you might expect, double-click any item in the Outlook 2002 Reminders window to open it. What I didn't learn until after I'd been using Outlook 2002 for many months is that you can mark tasks complete from the Reminders window. Just right-click the task reminder, and choose Mark Complete from the context menu.


    SPONSOR: MICROSOFT MOBILITY TOUR

    THE MICROSOFT MOBILITY TOUR IS COMING SOON TO A CITY NEAR YOU!
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    2. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • HAPPY 10TH ANNIVERSARY SQL SERVER!

  • Microsoft and SQL Server Magazine want to thank you for your support over the past 10 years. To show our appreciation, we're running a 20-week contest that will test your SQL Server knowledge. Answer our quiz, and you'll be entered in a biweekly drawing for cool prizes such as Microsoft Press books and MCDBA exam vouchers, plus a grand prize: a Microsoft Xbox! Enter today at
    http://www.sqlmag.com/quiz

  • GIVE US YOUR FEEDBACK AND BE ENTERED TO WIN AN XBOX

  • Tell us how well your enterprise is prepared for when disaster strikes. Complete our brief survey about backup and recovery, and you could win an Xbox. Click here!
    http://www.zoomerang.com/recipient/survey.zgi?ID=LXS1NQNTJ8K8&PIN=94295V32V0MQ

    3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

  • EAS: ENHANCED STORAGE MANAGEMENT FOR EXCHANGE

  • EAS manages the archiving, retention and retrieval of Exchange email according to established corporate policies. EAS migrates email from Exchange into a central archive information store. Free White Paper: EAS: Architecture, Scalability & Performance Overview
    http://www.educomts.com/whitepaper.htm

    4. RESOURCE
    (contributed by Sue Mosher, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • TIP: MESSAGE-CONTENT PROTECTION

  • Q: How can I send a mail message that the recipient can't modify?
    A: After a message leaves your Outbox, you have little control over what happens to it. However, Outlook lets you set the Sensitivity property of an outgoing message to Private. A user in your Exchange organization who receives a Private message won't be able to edit the message.

    Another approach is to use a digital signature on your message. Using a digital signature doesn't prevent the recipient from changing the message, but if the message was altered after you signed it, the digital signature will alert the recipient to that effect. Yet another method is to send the core of the message as a read-only attachment. For example, you can compose a Microsoft Word document and use Tools, Protect Document to password-protect the document against changes before you send it as an attachment.

    Several secure email services have sprung up to meet the demand for verification of message content and delivery and to control what happens to a message after you send it. Some of these services cause a message to self-destruct or expire after the recipient reads it or after a certain amount of time passes. Check out these products: CertifiedMail.com's solutions (http://www.certifiedmail.com), Omniva Policy Systems' Omniva Policy Manager (http://www.disappearing.com), mailedSAFE (http://www.mailedsafe.com/summary.htm), Authentica's MailRecall (http://www.authentica.com/products/mailrecall.asp), ReadNotify (http://www.readnotify.com), Sigaba Secure Email (http://www.sigaba.com), and ZixCorp's desktop and server solutions (http://www.zixcorp.com). Most of these products provide a free Outlook add-in to integrate directly with their services.

    See the Exchange & Outlook Administrator Web site for more great tips from Sue Mosher.
    http://www.exchangeadmin.com

    5. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, products@winnetmag.com)

  • FILTER SPAM MESSAGES

  • CS2Exchange Software released Repel for Outlook, add-in software that provides spam filtering. When you receive an email message, Repel for Outlook examines the header information and compares the sender with a database of known spam senders. You can set the software to move spam messages to a spam folder or the Deleted Items folder or to delete spam messages. Repel for Outlook costs $20 for a single-user license and runs on Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows Me, and Windows 9x systems. Multisite and site licenses are available. Contact CS2Exchange Software at 919-604-1258 or support@cs2exchange.com.
    http://www.cs2exchange.com

    6. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

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