A. Windows 2000 domains rely heavily on DNS entries. If you enable dynamic update on the relevant DNS zones, Win2K creates these entries automatically. Below is an explanation for each entry.

_ldap._tcp.<DNSDomainName>
Lets a client locate a Win2K domain controller in the domain named by <DNSDomainName>. A client searching for a domain controller in the domain savilltech.com would query the DNS server for _ldap._tcp.savilltech.com.

_ldap._tcp.<SiteName>._sites.<DNSDomainName>
Lets a client find a Win2K domain controller in the domain and site specified (e.g., _ldap._tcp.london._sites.savilltech.com for a domain controller in the London site of savilltech.com).

_ldap._tcp.pdc._ms-dcs.<DNSDomainName>
Lets a client find the PDC flexible single master object (FSMO) role holder of a mixed-mode domain. Only the PDC of the domain registers this record.

_ldap._tcp.gc._msdcs.<DNSTreeName>
Lets a client find a Global Catalog (GC) server. Only domain controllers serving as GC servers for the tree will register this name. If a server ceases to be a GC server, the server will deregister the record.

_ldap._tcp.._sites.gc._msdcs.<DNSTreeName>
Lets a client find a GC server in the specified site (e.g., _ldap._tcp.london._sites.gc._msdcs.savilltech.com).

_ldap._tcp.<DomainGuid>.domains._msdcs.<DNSTreeName>
Lets a client find a domain controller in a domain based on the domain controller’s globally unique ID. A GUID is a 128-bit (8 byte) number that generates automatically for referencing Active Directory objects.

<DNSDomainName>
Lets a client find a domain controller through a normal Host record.

Below is an example DNS screen for a domain.


Click here to view image