A. The link-state information is actually stored in memory on the Exchange Server system and isn't written to disk. The routing master in each routing group receives and maintains the link-state information (i.e., the link-state table) that routing-group members send to the routing master whenever an Exchange Server system determines that a link has changed state. The routing master is the only server that can increment the link-state version numbers in the link-state table. The routing master also sends the link-state table to routing masters in other routing groups, so that each routing group has a complete picture of the entire Exchange Server organization.

The link-state table contains information about the connectors, servers, routing groups, address spaces, link states, costs, versions, and organization to determine the most cost-effective route for a message delivery. You can use the WinRoute tool to obtain link-state information about your Exchange Server organization. Winroute.exe displays all unformatted information that's transferred from the link-state port (TCP port 691) in the bottom pane of its UI. You can find the WinRoute tool in the \support\utils\i386 folder on the Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2000 CD-ROM. You can also download the WinRoute tool.