A. Two things may be happening - either SQL Server is internally gpf'ing/AV'ing (same thing) - you should see messages to this effect in the SQL errorlog. Or there is a net-lib bug with overlapped/fragmented packets.

For either problem you can try applying the latest SP to the server. 

For net-lib bugs you will need to apply to the client as well. Also the version of ADO/ODBC can help cause the problem as well, so try upgrading. The latest versions of these drivers can be had via www.microsoft.com/data.

If you're getting access violation messages, then see the FAQ entry on access violations in the FAQ. If not read-on for net-lib problems.

If you are getting a problem with TDS packet fragmentation (TDS is SQL's application level protocol) then try a different net-lib - e.g. tcp-ip instead of named-pipes or vice-versa. If still no-go then you'll need to call Microsoft PSS.

Even if a different net-lib fixed the problem, then please still report the problem to Microsoft PSS. Unless Microsoft get these bug reports then they can't fix them. (With a repro script an MVP will do it for you). Your call fee WILL be re-imbursed as all calls about bugs are free. (However, on the "normal" support-line the person answering the phone can't know it's a bug, so they'll need your credit card details anyway).

Microsoft will need you to supply :-

SQL Errorlog(s)
NT event log(s) - if any NT errors were occuring at the time
TSQL code running at the time
Details of hardware, version of NT, servicepacks etc. WINMSDP output is good for this.
A SQL Trace of what happens at the time of the error
Possibly a network trace between client and server as well

With SQL 7 there is a new utility that will garner most of this information for you automatically. It is called sqldiag - 
sqldiag -U<login> -P<password> -O<output filename>