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Questions (August 17, 2001)
Answers (August 17, 2001)

This week's questions cover topics for Exam 70-215: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Server.

Questions (August 17, 2001)

Question 1
You run Active Directory (AD) on your company network. One DHCP server serves the entire company, but you'd like to add another for fault tolerance and load-balancing. You plan to install DHCP on one of your Windows 2000 servers. Which of the following must be true of the server that you install the DHCP service on if you want it to hand out IP addresses to computers on your company's network properly? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. The server must be authorized as a DHCP server in AD.
  2. The server must be a domain controller (DC).
  3. The server must be a member server.
  4. The server must contain an NTFS partition.
  5. The server must have a static IP address.
  6. The server must not be a Remote Installation Services (RIS) server.

Question 2
When you configure VPN in Windows 2000, the system presents you with two protocols that you can use: L2TP and PPTP. Which of the following are correct statements about the differences between L2TP and PPTP? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. PPTP supports header compression, L2TP doesn't.
  2. PPTP offers built-in encryption, L2TP doesn't.
  3. L2TP can transmit over Frame Relay, X.25, and ATM, but PPTP can't.
  4. PPTP transmits over IP-based networks, L2TP doesn't.
  5. L2TP supports tunnel authentication, PPTP doesn't.

Question 3
On his dual-boot laptop, Mark works mostly with Windows 98, but he occasionally runs Windows 2000 Server so that he can get to know that OS. His laptop's hard disk contains one FAT32 partition. While running Win2K Server, Mark tries to use the disk management utility to upgrade from basic disk to dynamic disk, but he's unable to do so. What's the best explanation for Mark's inability to convert the disk to a dynamic disk?

  1. Win98 doesn't support dynamic disks. You can't convert a disk to dynamic if an OS other than Win2K is installed on it.
  2. Win2K doesn't support upgrades to dynamic disk on laptops because laptops typically can't take advantage of the options that dynamic disks provide.
  3. You must first convert all FAT32 partitions to NTFS before you upgrade from a basic disk to a dynamic disk.
  4. Instead of the disk management utility, Mark should have used convert.exe to convert the basic disk to dynamic disk.

Answers (August 17, 2001)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answers are A--The server must be authorized as a DHCP server in AD; and E--The server must have a static IP address. For the DHCP service to function properly on a computer, the server must be authorized as a DHCP server in AD, must not be acting simultaneously as a DHCP client, and must have a static IP address

Answer to Question 2
The correct answers are B--PPTP offers built-in encryption; L2TP doesn't; C--L2TP can transmit over Frame Relay, X25, and ATM; PPTP can't; and E--L2TP supports tunnel authentication; PPTP doesn't. PPTP uses built-in PPP encryption, which is sometimes called Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption (MPPE), and L2TP lets you use IP Security (IPSec) encryption. PPTP and L2TP can both run on IP-based networks, but L2TP can encapsulate PPP frames over X.25, Frame Relay, and ATM networks as well.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answer is B--Win2K doesn't support upgrades to dynamic disk on laptops because laptops typically can't take advantage of the options that dynamic disks provide. Because laptops typically support just one internal hard disk, they can't take advantage of dynamic disks’ advanced volume options. Dynamic disks have advantages over basic disks only when a system has two or more dynamic disks.

Win98 doesn't support dynamic disks. However, nothing prevents you from upgrading a hard disk on which you have installed Win2K to dynamic disk. Of course, if you performed such an upgrade, other OSs would no longer run.