Covering Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista
I’d like to respond to Robert Singer’s letter in the April issue regarding Windows IT Pro’s coverage of Server 2008 and Vista. I’ve been using Server 2008 for about nine months and Vista for over a year. Only a few Server 2008 books are available, so any magazine content and online information about the OS is quite salient and appreciated. Yes, many of us are still running Windows Server 2003, but countless Windows 2003 and Windows XP books are available. To lead projects and help our customers to the best of our abilities, we have to possess the most up-to-date IT knowledge. Personally, I look forward to additional articles about Server 2008 and Vista. Keep up the good work!

—Bill O’Sullivan

Final Hyper-V Specs
I found errors in Michael Otey’s article, “A First Look at Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V” (InstantDoc ID 97857, February 2008). First, the maximum RAM for a virtual machine (VM) under Hyper-V using Server 2008 x64 Enterprise and Server 2008 x64 Data Center Edition is 64GB RAM, not 32GB. The 32GB limit is relevant only for Server 2008 x64 Standard Edition. Next, the maximum number of CPUs for Server 2008 x64 Data Center Edition is 64, not 32. You can review the specs at www.microsoft.com/windows server2008/en/us/compare-specs.aspx. Finally, the official role name is Hyper-V, not Windows Server Virtualization; only the CTP version of the product used that name.

—Robert Larson

Robert is correct about the OS’s maximum supported memory and number of CPUs, as well as the official role name, Hyper-V. These specs changed from the beta version that I used to write the article.

—Michael Otey

Reader to Reader to Reader
Apostolos Fotakelis’ Reader to Reader tip, “Use ADSI Edit to Associate File Extensions” (March 2007, InstantDoc ID 97782), was awesome. However, Step 6—which discusses how to find the correct GPO in the GPO GUID\User\Class Store\Packages node—contains a mistake. Because we’re talking about the Packages node, “GPO” should read “program to be installed by the GPO.” In other words, if the GPO deploys more than one program, you have to manually find the correct program (not GPO) by double-clicking each program and checking the displayName attribute’s value.

—Dimitrios Kalemis

Xbox 360 for IT?!
Tonight, I started paging through my latest issue of Windows IT Pro, and eventually I found myself at the fifth paragraph of Karen Forster’s “The Next Wave of Microsoft Virtualization” (April 2008, InstantDoc ID 98293). Was I actually reading about administrators using something called Microsoft Xbox Server 2009 for IT purposes? Were there really 27 versions planned? Insane! Then, I looked at the bottom corner of the page for the date and smiled when I saw “April 2008.” You got me!

—Brad Veneracion