A. Microsoft offers the Hyper-V Network VSP Bind Application, which can be used for command line protocol binding management. This is especially useful in Server Core environments where you don't have the normal network management GUI.

Once you've downloaded and installed the tool, you can run it with no parameters to show adapters and the status of each bindable protocol. For example, I see the following output:

Hyper-V Network VSP Bind Application 6.1.7690.0.
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


Adapters:

\\{A64C6A55-A5EF-4DFF-87808D4F56C7D25D\\}
"vms_mp"
"Microsoft Hyper-V Network Switch Default Miniport"
"Local Area Connection":
enabled: ms_netbios (NetBIOS Interface)
enabled: ms_server (File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks)
enabled: ms_pacer (QoS Packet Scheduler)
disabled: ms_ndiscap (NDIS Capture LightWeight Filter)
enabled: ms_wfplwf (WFP Lightweight Filter)
enabled: ms_msclient (Client for Microsoft Networks)
enabled: ms_tcpip6 (Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6))
enabled: ms_netbt (WINS Client(TCP/IP) Protocol)
enabled: ms_smb (Microsoft NetbiosSmb)
enabled: ms_tcpip (Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4))
enabled: ms_lltdio (Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver)
enabled: ms_rspndr (Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder)
enabled: ms_pppoe (Point to Point Protocol Over Ethernet)
enabled: ms_ndisuio (NDIS Usermode I/O Protocol)
disabled: vms_pp (Microsoft Virtual Network Switch Protocol)

You can then use the -d and -e switches to disable and enable binding. For example,

nvspbind -d \\{GUID of adapter\\}ms_msclient

Would disable the binding of the Microsoft Client for Microsoft Networks.

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