Welcome to Certifiable, your exam prep headquarters. Here you'll find questions about some of the tricky areas that are fair game for the certification exams. Following the questions, you'll find the correct answers and explanatory text. We change the questions weekly.

Questions (June 22, 2001)
Answers (June 22, 2001)

Questions (June 22, 2001)

Question 1
You recently upgraded a Windows NT Workstation 4.0 computer to Windows 2000 Professional. The computer contains two hard disks with two primary partitions on each disk. The person using the computer runs several applications that perform many I/O operations. You want to optimize disk performance on this system, but you aren't concerned about fault tolerance. Which of the following actions should you perform? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Convert the disks from basic disks to dynamic disks.
  2. Convert the disks to the FAT file system.
  3. Create a mirrored volume across the disks.
  4. Create a RAID-5 volume across the disks.
  5. Create a spanned volume across the disks.
  6. Create a striped volume across the disks.

Question 2
You're planning your company's Windows 2000 Professional deployment. After doing some initial research, you decide that you want the following features on all of the partitions for your desktops:

  • Disk quotas
  • File encryption
  • Offline files

    Initially, you'll use basic disks with these computers but might convert the disks to dynamic disks later. Which of the following guidelines should you follow to achieve these objectives? (Choose all that apply.)

    1. Don't create volumes that you might want to extend later.
    2. Don't install the Terminal Services Client on these computers.
    3. Format all partitions with the FAT file system.
    4. Format all partitions with the FAT32 file system.
    5. Format all partitions with NTFS.
    6. Leave several megabytes of unformatted free space on each disk.

    Question 3
    You're running Windows 2000 Professional on a computer that has three partitions (C, D, and E). Partitions C and D are formatted with NTFS while partition E is formatted with FAT32.

    You've compressed some files on the D drive. A coworker asks you what will happen to the compressed files if you move or copy them. Which of the following statements regarding moving and copying compressed files is correct?

    1. Files moved to the C drive retain their compression status; files moved to a different location on the D drive inherit the compression status of the folder they are moved to; and files moved to the E drive become uncompressed.
    2. Files moved to the C drive inherit the compression status of the folder they are moved to; files moved to a different location on the D drive retain their compression status; and files moved to the E drive become uncompressed.
    3. Files copied to the C drive retain their compression status; files copied to a different location on the D drive inherit the compression status of the folder they are copied to; and files moved to the E drive retain their compression status.
    4. Files copied to the C drive inherit the compression status of the folder that they are copied to; files moved to a different location on the D drive retain their compression status; and files moved to the E drive inherit the compression status of the folder they are moved to.

    Answers (June 22, 2001)

    Answer to Question 1
    The correct answers are A—Convert the disks from basic disks to dynamic disks; and F—Create a striped volume across the disks. You need at least two dynamic disks to create a striped volume. A striped volume stores data in stripes on two or more physical disks. Data in a striped volume is allocated alternately and evenly (in stripes) to the striped volume's disks. Striped volumes substantially improve the speed of access to your hard disk. However, striped volumes don't provide any fault tolerance.

    Answer to Question 2
    The correct answers are A—Don't create volumes that you might want to extend later; E—Format all partitions with NTFS; and F—Leave several megabytes of unformatted free space on each disk.

    If you upgrade a basic volume to dynamic (by upgrading the basic disk to dynamic), you can't extend the volume. You must format all partitions with NTFS to support disk quotas, file encryption, and offline files. For an upgrade from basic disk to dynamic disk to succeed, any disks you upgrade must contain at least 1MB of unallocated space.

    Answer to Question 3
    The correct answer is B—Files moved to the C drive inherit the compression status of the folder they are moved to; files moved to a different location on the D drive retain their compression status; and files moved to the E drive become uncompressed.

    When you move a file or folder within a single NTFS volume, the file or folder retains its compressed status (i.e., an uncompressed file or folder stays uncompressed while a compressed file or folder stays compressed). When you move a file or folder between NTFS volumes, the file or folder inherits the compression status of the destination folder. When you move a file or folder to FAT (or FAT32) volumes, the folders and files become uncompressed because FAT volumes don't support compression.