Exchange and Outlook UPDATE, Outlook Edition—brought to you by Exchange & Outlook Administrator, a print newsletter from Windows & .NET Magazine that contains practical advice, how-to articles, tips, and techniques to help you do your job today.
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February 4, 2003—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • Time to Upgrade?

2. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Don't Miss Our 2 New Security Web Seminars in March!
  • Windows & .NET Magazine Connections: Real-World Technical Tips Here for You

3. RESOURCE

  • Tip: Printing a Calendar Category

4. NEW AND IMPROVED

  • Back Up Exchange Files

5. CONTACT US
See this section for a list of ways to contact us.


1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by Sue Mosher, News Editor, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • TIME TO UPGRADE?
  • This might be the year for organizations still running Microsoft Office 97 or Outlook 98 to finally upgrade. Microsoft will end all assisted support for Office 97 and Outlook 98 in January 2004, offering only Web-based self-help support after that date. Many administrators might not realize that, even though Office 97 support continues for a few more months, Outlook 97 is already an unsupported product, its assisted support lifecycle having ended in 2001.

    Perhaps to encourage organizations with Office 97 to accelerate their upgrades, Microsoft recently published a 43-page white paper about migrating Office 97 to Office XP. The paper addresses all three communities with a potential interest in the migration: users who might see differences as they go about their day-to-day activities, administrators planning and supporting the migration, and developers concerned about the continued viability of their corporate applications. Tables summarize the feature differences between Office 97 and Office XP applications and even show where particular menu commands have moved in the most recent version. For someone preparing a justification for a migration, these tables are a gold mine. Help desks, too, will be delighted to have a guide to where various menu commands have moved so that they can reassure befuddled users that the features haven't disappeared, they've just moved to a new neighborhood.

    The paper's authors contend that Office XP is technically superior to its predecessors not just because of improved features and better performance but also because the built-in Office Error Reporting tool can help track down and eliminate many bugs that would have been difficult to isolate in earlier Office versions. In addition, the reporting tool has helped eliminate almost all memory leaks and get fixes into service packs faster. And, the authors say, Office XP shipped with fewer serious bugs than any earlier version.

    The white paper authors also cite improved installation tools, found in the "Microsoft Office XP Resource Kit," and better international support. Calling Office XP more secure than earlier versions, the authors write that the security flaws that do exist "are defensible and can easily be mitigated through other means." Strangely, though, the paper omits all mention of attachment blocking, the Outlook "object model guard," and the fact that unpublished and "one-off" Outlook forms won't run code in Outlook 2002. These items certainly are key factors that developers and Help desk staff must consider when moving from Outlook 97 to Outlook 2002.

    The paper makes a general recommendation that developers explore late binding (i.e., declaring an object as an Object rather than as an explicit data type) as one technique that can help minimize problems for in-house applications that must run on both Office XP and Office 97. The authors also note that the inspections that some antivirus programs perform on Office documents can slow down some custom macros and recommend an upgrade to the most recent version of your antivirus software.

    The move from Outlook 97 to Outlook 2002 should be simpler than going from Outlook 97 to either Outlook 2000 or Outlook 98. Those intermediate versions require an understanding of the separate Corporate/Workgroup and Internet Mail Only modes for mail configuration. But, like Outlook 97, Outlook 2002 has just one mechanism for setting up email accounts. Tools such as the Preview Pane and Rules Wizard that required separate installations in Outlook 97 are now integrated into the product.

    Some organizations, having seen the new user interface in Outlook 11, might be wondering whether to skip Office XP entirely and wait for the midyear release of Office 11. However, many large organizations won't be able to plan, test, and implement a full Office 11 migration before Office 97 support runs out. Instead, they might want to go with Office XP now and, under the Software Assurance (SA) plan, buy licenses that let them upgrade to Office 11 those users or departments who can really benefit from the new features in that version.

    "Office 97 to Microsoft Office XP Migration Issues" white paper

    2. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • DON'T MISS OUR 2 NEW SECURITY WEB SEMINARS IN MARCH!

  • Windows & .NET Magazine has two new Web seminars to help you address your security concerns. There is no fee to attend "Selling the Importance of Security: 5 Ways to Get Your Manager's Attention" and "Building an Ultra Secure Extranet on a Shoe String," but space is limited, so register today!

  • WINDOWS & .NET MAGAZINE CONNECTIONS: REAL-WORLD TECHNICAL TIPS HERE FOR YOU

  • Chock-full of "been there, done that" information from experts who use Microsoft technologies in the real world. Get the latest updates on security, Microsoft Exchange Server, wireless, Microsoft .NET, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000, and more. Exclusive opportunity to interact firsthand with Windows & .NET Magazine writers. Go to http://www.winconnections.com

    3. RESOURCE
    (contributed by Sue Mosher, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • TIP: PRINTING A CALENDAR CATEGORY

  • Q: How do I print a specific category from an Outlook calendar?

    A: You can print only what you see in Outlook folders. If you want to print only a specific category, for example, or only items that aren't marked private, you need to filter out the items you don't want to print. You can create a filter on the currently open view with the View, Current View, Customize Current View, Filter command.

    If you plan to print that view often, create a new named view that you can switch to anytime. You can use View, Current View, Define Views to create a new view. Or if you're already displaying a filtered view, in the current view drop-down list on the Advanced toolbar, type the name of the new view you want to create, then press Enter. This action creates a new view with the name you entered, and the view uses the current view settings for that folder.

    See the Exchange & Outlook Administrator Web site for more great tips from Sue Mosher.

    4. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, products@winnetmag.com)

  • BACK UP EXCHANGE FILES

  • Syncsort released Backup Express 2.1.5, enterprisewide backup and restoration software that lets you back up and restore Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 5.5 at the database, folder, or message level. Backup Express can back up nodes running Windows, UNIX, or Novell NetWare and supports Network Attached Storage (NAS), Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP), Storage Area Network (SAN), NetWare cluster, and other heterogeneous network configurations. For pricing, contact Syncsort at 201-930-8200.
    http://www.syncsort.com

    5. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • ABOUT THE COMMENTARY — olupdate@slipstick.com
    • ABOUT THE NEWSLETTER IN GENERAL — rmunshi@winnetmag.com
      (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)
    • TECHNICAL QUESTIONS — http://www.winnetmag.net/forums
    • PRODUCT NEWS — products@winnetmag.com
    • QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR Exchange and Outlook UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION?
      Customer Support — winnetmagupdate@winnetmag.com