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Questions (September 28, 2001)
Answers (September 28, 2001)

This week's questions cover topics for Exam 70-210: Installing, Configuring, and Administrating Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional.

Questions (September 28, 2001)

Question 1
You're creating two custom Microsoft Management Consoles (MMCs) to use on your company network. The first console, topadmin.msc, will help senior administrators perform daily tasks on the network. The second console, levelone.msc, will let entry-level support staff perform limited troubleshooting functions.

You want to grant topadmin.msc users the ability to make changes to the MMC, including the ability to add or remove snap-ins, create new windows, create taskpad views and tasks, add items to the Favorites list, and view all portions of the console tree. You want to grant levelone.msc users full access to the console tree and all window-management commands but prevent them from adding or removing snap-ins and from changing the console properties. Which of the following options would best achieve these objectives? (Choose the best answer.)

  1. Configure topadmin.msc with "Author mode" access and levelone.msc with "User mode—limited access, multiple window" access.
  2. Configure topadmin.msc with "Author mode" access and levelone.msc with "User mode— full access" access.
  3. Configure topadmin.msc with "User mode—full access" access and levelone.msc with "Author mode" access.
  4. Configure topadmin.msc with "User mode—full access" access and levelone.msc with "User mode—limited access, multiple window" access.

Question 2
Which of the following tasks can you perform in Windows 2000 Professional without using additional third-party software or tape backup utilities? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Convert a partition from FAT to NTFS without data loss.
  2. Convert a partition from FAT to FAT32 without data loss.
  3. Convert a partition from FAT32 to FAT without data loss.
  4. Convert a partition from FAT32 to NTFS without data loss.
  5. Convert a partition from NTFS to FAT without data loss.
  6. Convert a partition from NTFS to FAT32 without data loss.
  7. Convert a disk from a basic disk to a dynamic disk without data loss.
  8. Convert a disk from a dynamic disk to a basic disk without data loss.

Question 3
On your network, you support a mix of Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 98, and Windows 95 clients. The clients are distributed between four subnets. You plan to migrate your Win9x clients to Win2K Pro, but you probably won't begin the migration for at least another year. In the meantime, you want to let all the clients connect to all the other clients and share data and printers. However, you want to minimize the amount of administration involved when you add a new computer to the network or when a computer's IP address changes. What's the best way to let these clients interact using user-friendly NetBIOS names? (Choose the best answer.)

  1. Create a DHCP server for the network and configure all the client computers to use that server.
  2. Create a DNS server for the network and configure all the client computers to use that server.
  3. Create a WINS server for the network and configure all the client computers to use that server.
  4. Configure all the client computers to support multicasting.
  5. Configure all the client computers to use Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA).
  6. Implement HOSTS files on all the client computers.
  7. Implement LMHOSTS files on all the client computers.

Answers (September 28, 2001)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answer is B—Configure topadmin.msc with "Author mode" access and levelone.msc with "User mode—full access" access. You can assign "Author mode" access to a console to grant full access to all MMC functionality, including the ability to add or remove snap-ins, create new windows, create taskpad views and tasks, add items to the Favorites list, and view all portions of the console tree. If you select one of the user mode options, you remove access to authoring features that most users don’t need. For example, if you assign the "User mode—full access option" to a console, all window-management commands and full access to the console tree remain available, but users can't add or remove snap-ins or change the console properties. For more information, see Console Access Options at the Microsoft Web site.

Answer to Question 2
The correct answers are A—Convert a partition from FAT to NTFS without data loss; D—Convert a partition from FAT32 to NTFS without data loss; and G—Convert a disk from a basic disk to a dynamic disk without data loss. You can use the Convert command to convert drives from FAT or FAT32 to NTFS. If you want to change file systems, you must use the Format command, which deletes all data on the drive. You can't convert NTFS drives to FAT or FAT32. Also, you can't convert FAT to FAT32 or FAT32 to FAT in Win2K.

You can use Win2K's Disk Management utility to upgrade a basic disk to a dynamic disk. After you upgrade a basic disk to a dynamic disk, you can't change the dynamic volumes back to partitions. Instead, you must delete all dynamic volumes on the disk and then use the Revert To Basic Disk command.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answer is C—Create a WINS server for the network and configure all the client computers to use that server. Win2K is the first Microsoft OS that no longer requires NetBIOS naming. However, to provide support for legacy OSs (such as Win9x), NetBIOS support is typically required. You can resolve NetBIOS names through the use of LMHOSTS files, which are located on each client computer. However, the administrative burden involved with using LMHOSTS files is typically prohibitive. In most cases, a better solution is to install WINS on one or more servers on your company's network. WINS provides a distributed database for registering and querying dynamic mappings of NetBIOS names for computers on your network and maps NetBIOS names to IP addresses.

For more information, see WINS Defined and When to use WINS at the Microsoft Web site.