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Questions (August 23, 2002)
Answers (August 23, 2002)

This week's questions cover topics for Exam 70-270: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional.

Questions (August 23, 2002)

Question 1
Axel has installed a new device driver for an 802.11b PCMCIA card on his Windows XP Professional laptop. To optimize performance, Axel disabled the System Restore option soon after he took possession of the machine. The installation routine for the new PCMCIA card suggests that Axel reboot the computer before using the card.

Axel reboots, sees the XP logon prompt, andlogs on. However, before the desktop appears, the laptop freezes and displays an error message. After trying several key combinations, Axel decides to press the on/off button to restart the machine. Which startup options might be helpful in diagnosing and fixing this problem? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Directory Service Restore Mode
  2. Safe Mode with Command Prompt
  3. Safe Mode
  4. Last Known Good Configuration
  5. The Recovery Console

Question 2
Boris has a Windows XP Professional system with a 50GB physical disk that contains two volumes. The first volume (C:, 15GB) contains the XP operating file and boot files. The second volume (D:, 20GB) contains mostly data and a few programs. Boris is running out of space on the D: volume and wants to add some of the unpartitioned free space to the volume. However, when Boris attempts to do make this change, he can't. What are possible reasons why this operation failed? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. The disk is a dynamic disk. You can't extend volumes on dynamic disks.
  2. The D: volume is the system partition. You can't extend the system partition.
  3. The D: volume isn't NTFS. You can extend a simple volume only if the file system is NTFS.
  4. The disk was initially a basic disk but Boris later converted it to a dynamic disk. You can only extend volumes that you originally created on dynamic disks.

Question 3
Your Windows XP Professional laptop has three partitions (C:, D:, and E:). The C: and D: partitions are NTFS and the E: partition is FAT32. The C: partition is running out of space, so you want to move some of the data to other partitions.

A folder named C:\simulationresult contains 12GB of data. This folder and its contents are compressed to about 40 percent of their original size. You want to change the location of this folder from the C: partition to a folder on a different drive. However, you want the folder and its contents to remain compressed. Partition D has 20GB of free space, and partition E: has 20GB of free space. Which of the following actions would achieve your objective? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Move the simulationresult folder to a folder on D: named Misc, which is currently uncompressed.
  2. Move the simulationresult folder to a folder on E: named Docs, which is currently uncompressed.
  3. Move the simulationresult folder to a folder on D: named Info, which is currently compressed.
  4. Copy the simulationresult folder to a folder on E: named Stuff, which is currently uncompressed, and delete the original version of the folder on C:.
  5. Copy the simulationresult folder to a folder on D: named Data, which is currently compressed, and delete the original version of the folder on C:.

Answers (August 23, 2002)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answers are B—Safe Mode with Command Prompt; C—Safe Mode; and E—Recovery Console. XP Pro gives you several recovery options, including:

  • Safe Mode, which starts XP with only basic files and drivers.
  • Safe Mode with Command Prompt, which starts XP with only basic files and drivers and displays the command prompt after logon.
  • Last Known Good Configuration, which starts XP using the registry information that Windows saved during the last shutdown.
  • The Recovery Console (RC), which starts a command-line interface that provides a limited set of administrative commands.

Last Known Good Configuration can be a great recovery option, but it's not useful in this scenario because Axel logged on successfully after he made the configuration change, which created a new Last Known Good Configuration. Directory Service Restore Mode is a Safe Mode startup option for Windows XP Server, but it's not an option for XP Pro.

Answer to Question 2
The correct answers are C—The D: volume isn't NTFS. You can extend a simple volume only if the file system is NTFS; and D—The disk was initially a basic disk but Boris later converted it to a dynamic disk. You can create only simple volumes on dynamic disks. You can extend only volumes that you originally created on dynamic disks. If a volume existed before you upgraded the disk to dynamic, you can never extend that volume. If you try to extend the volume, you receive the following error message:

"The selected volume was originally created on a basic disk and cannot be extended. Only volumes originally created on dynamic disks can be extended."

In this question, the C: volume is the system partition. You can't extend the system partition.

You can extend a simple volume only if the file system is NTFS. You can use the FAT or NTFS file system to create a spanned volume, which is a simple volume that exists on more than one disk. However, if you create a simple or spanned volume with the FAT file system, you can't extend the volume or span it further. You can reformat the volume using NTFS and regain the ability to extend or span the volume.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answers are C—Move the simulationresult folder to a folder on D: named Info, which is currently compressed; and E—Copy the simulationresult folder to a folder on D: named Data, which is currently compressed, and delete the original version of the folder on C:. If you add or copy a file to a compressed folder, the system compresses that file automatically. If you move a file from a different NTFS drive into a compressed folder, the system compresses the file. However, if you move a file from the same NTFS drive into a compressed folder, the file retains its original state—either compressed or uncompressed. Likewise, if you add or copy a file into an uncompressed folder, the system uncompresses that file. If you move a file from a different NTFS drive into an uncompressed folder, the system uncompresses the file. However, if you move a file from the same NTFS drive into an uncompressed folder, the file retains its original state—either compressed or uncompressed.