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Questions (April 27, 2001)
Answers (April 27, 2001)

This week's questions focus on topics for Exam 70-215: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Server.

Questions (April 27, 2001)

Question 1
You installed a new device driver on your Windows 2000 Server. When you restart your system, you receive a blue screen error. What's the easiest way to attempt to restore your system to a bootable state?

  1. Start the machine, and when the list of available OSs appears, press F8 to get to the Windows 2000 Advanced Options Menu. Choose Directory Service Restore Mode. Remove the device driver, and reboot your system.
  2. Start the machine, and when the list of available OSs appears, press F8 to get to the Windows 2000 Advanced Options Menu. Choose Last Known Good Configuration.
  3. Boot from the Emergency Repair Disk (ERD). Choose the Fast Repair (press F) Option.
  4. Open the Control Panel System applet, select the Hardware Profiles tab, and then select Driver Signing. Under file signature verification, choose Block.

Question 2
Stephen has some sensitive data stored on a Win2K Professional computer that he shares with several other users. He wants to prevent other users—with the exception of Mary—who use the computer from being able to read, delete, or write to any of these sensitive files.

All of the files are in the ProjectX folder, which is currently shared out. Stephen configures the shared folder permissions so that only he and Mary have access to it. However, when Stephen comes to work several days later, he discovers that some of the files have been modified, and several have even been deleted. He checks with Mary but finds that she was out of the office during this time, and therefore wasn't the one who modified and deleted the files.

What is the best explanation for this problem, and what should Stephen do to prevent it from happening again?

  1. Stephen didn't configure Encrypting File System (EFS) for the files. You must use EFS if you want to prevent other users of a computer from gaining access to files stored on that computer.
  2. The folder was shared out. Although Stephen configured permissions for the folder, these permissions don't affect anyone who tries to access this resource over the network. A network user probably modified and deleted the files. Stop sharing the folder to prevent this problem from happening again.
  3. Stephen didn't configure the folder as a hidden share. Therefore, it was visible to all users on the network, and any user who could browse the network could have modified or deleted the files. Configure the folder as a hidden share by appending a dollar sign to the end of the shared folder name (e.g., ProjectX$).
  4. Stephen set shared folder permissions instead of NTFS permissions for the folder and the files in it. Shared folder permissions don't apply when a user attempts to access the resource locally. Configure NTFS permissions for the sensitive files.

Question 3
All of the users in your company have their home directories stored on a server named FS7. Recently, users have complained that it takes a long time to access the files in their home directories. The home directories are currently stored on the D drive, which is 6GB and has been formatted with NTFS. Which of the following actions could you perform on FS7 to improve access speed to these files? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Run the "diskperf -yv" command on the server.
  2. Convert the drive to FAT by running the command "convert d: /fs:fat" from the command prompt.
  3. Use disk compression on the home directories to reduce the size of the files in the home directories.
  4. Defragment the D drive using the Disk Defragmenter Utility that's located in Disk Manager.
  5. Back up the data stored on FS7. Upgrade the disk subsystem. Restore the data to the upgraded disk subsystem.

Answers (April 27, 2001)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answer is B—Start the machine, and when the list of available OSs appears, press F8 to get to the Windows 2000 Advanced Options Menu. Choose Last Known Good Configuration.

Choosing Last Known Good Configuration provides a way to recover from such problems as an incorrect driver for your hardware. It doesn't solve problems that corrupted or missing drivers or files cause.

To start Win2K using the last known good configuration, perform the following steps:

  1. Click Start, Shut Down.
  2. Click Restart, then click OK.
  3. When you see the message "Please select the operating system to start," press F8.
  4. Use the arrow keys to highlight Last Known Good Configuration, and press Enter.
  5. Use the arrow keys to highlight an OS, and press Enter.

Answer to Question 2
The correct answer is D—Stephen set shared folder permissions instead of NTFS permissions for the folder and the files in it. Shared folder permissions don't apply when a user attempts to access the resource locally. Configure NTFS permissions for the sensitive files.

Shared folder permissions apply to all files and subfolders in the shared folder and are effective only when users access the folders or files over a network. Shared folder permissions don't protect folders or files opened locally. To protect files and folders on your local computer, use NTFS permissions, which operate in addition to shared folder permissions.

EFS would have been a good candidate to use in this situation except that EFS doesn't let you share encrypted documents with other users. If Stephen had encrypted the files using EFS, Mary couldn't have accessed them.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answers are D—Defragment the D drive using the Disk Defragmenter Utility that is located in Disk Manager; and E—Back up the data stored on FS7. Upgrade the disk subsystem. Restore the data to the upgraded disk subsystem.

Both defragmenting the drive and upgrading the disk subsystem can lead to improved disk-access time.

The Diskperf command lets you obtain performance counter data for logical drives or storage volumes. Because disk counters can cause a modest increase in disk access time, Win2K doesn't automatically activate the Logical Disk object on system startup.

Although disk compression can reduce the amount of space that files consume, it can negatively affect performance because it increases CPU utilization. Although disk performance might improve on smaller volumes with highly compressible data, in this example, it would likely degrade performance.