A. Yes, anti-virus software will often object to the way Hyper-V accesses the file system and will attempt to block Hyper-V, which will cause Hyper-V to fail. The following should be excluded from antivirus monitoring:

  • Default and custom locations for the storage of virtual machine configuration
  • Default and custom locations for the storage of virtual hard disks
  • Snapshot folders
  • Vmms.exe and Vmwp.exe

If these are excluded, there should be no problems with Hyper-V and antivirus software.

Related Reading:
  • Virtualizing Exchange 2007 and Exchange 2003 with Hyper-V
  • Q. I've added a symbolic link to the Virtual Machines folder under Hyper-V but my virtual machine isn't being displayed in the Hyper-V management console. What's wrong?
  • Can I run antivirus software on a Windows Server 2008 Core system?
  • Q. Can I mix Hyper-V Server 2008 R2 and regular Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition installations in a single cluster?


  • Check out hundreds more useful Q&As like this in John Savill's FAQ for Windows. Also, watch instructional videos made by John at ITTV.net.