A: Microsoft showed the next version of Hyper-V in (what is codenamed) Windows Server 8 At the Worldwide Partner Conference in July 2011. They had a VM with 16 virtual CPUs assigned to it. This is way beyond the current limit of four virtual CPUs per VM. 16 isn't the maximum—the maximum hasn't been confirmed. Rather, the demo machine they used had 16 cores. The final version will support more than 16 virtual CPUs per VM which is great news. However, research still shows that very few workloads require more than eight virtual CPUs.

Microsoft also announced Hyper-V Replica, which will enable asynchronous replication of VMs between hosts. No further details were given, but it sounds like it's going to be a game changer.

Hyper-V will remain part of the Windows Server OS, with no additional license costs beyond the OS licenses.