Windows XP and 2000 Tips & Tricks UPDATE—brought to you by the Windows & .NET Magazine Network and the Windows 2000 FAQ site
http://www.windowsitpro.com


THIS ISSUE SPONSORED BY

Port UNIX Applications to Windows Cost-effectively
http://www.mkssoftware.com/products/tk/ds_tkedev.asp

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http://www.winnetmag.com/seminars/rimwireless


SPONSOR: PORT UNIX APPLICATIONS TO WINDOWS COST-EFFECTIVELY

MKS Toolkit for Enterprise Developers (formerly NuTCRACKER) is the proven solution for porting robust, mission-critical UNIX applications to Windows! Port UNIX, C, C++ and Fortran applications to Windows easily, leveraging existing investments. Run UNIX applications as native Windows programs that take full advantage of COM, .Net and other Windows features. And, maintain a single source base across UNIX and Windows saving time and money for years to come. Call 800-637-8034; +1 (703) 803-3343 today and see why MKS Toolkit for Enterprise Developers should be your UNIX to Windows solution. Request a free 30 day Evaluation:
http://www.mkssoftware.com/eval/default.asp?distrib=Win


April 7, 2003—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

2. FAQS

  • Q. How can I view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express?
  • Q. How can I disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE)?
  • Q. How can I enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations?
  • Q. How can I prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer's file types list in Windows 2000?
  • Q. Why did my USB 1.1 devices stop working after I updated a driver for a USB 2.0 device?

3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

  • OpenView for Windows Test Drive

4. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Join The HP & Microsoft Network Storage Solutions Road Show!
  • Sample Our Security Administrator Newsletter!

5. CONTACT US

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by John Savill, FAQ Editor, jsavill@winnetmag.com)

This week, I explain how to view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express, how to disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE), and how to enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations. I also tell you how to prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer and why some USB 1.1 devices might stop working after you update a USB 2.0 device driver.

Around the industry this week, Microsoft released Windows Server 2003 to manufacturing and made the new OS available to Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) subscribers. To thank the many beta testers who provided feedback during the development process, Microsoft also made a time-limited trial version of the new OS available for download.

Winternals, the people who create many great Windows utilities, has announced a new product called Recovery Manager (more information is available at the Winternals Web site). As the name implies, the software creates regular system snapshots that let you restore and recover key files and registry settings to get unstable and unbootable systems running as quickly as possible.


SPONSOR: WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY WEB SEMINAR

REGISTER NOW FOR OUR WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY WEB SEMINAR! Windows & .NET Magazine's newest Web seminar, sponsored by BlackBerry, covers what you need to know about wireless access and Exchange. Learn more about how to provide secure wireless access, what performance and scalability issues to watch out for, and what user issues you need to be prepared to handle as you roll out. There is no fee for this Web event, but space is limited. Register now!
http://www.winnetmag.com/seminars/rimwireless


2. FAQS

Q. How can I view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express?

A. To view the message source within Outlook Express, perform the following steps:

  1. Open Outlook Express, right-click the message, then select Properties.
  2. Select the Details tab.
  3. Click Message Source.

Alternatively, you can click the message and press Ctrl+F3.

Q. How can I disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE)?

A. To disable the F3 key search capability, perform the following steps:

  1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
  2. Navigate to the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Restrictions registry subkey. If this subkey doesn't exist, open the Edit menu and select New, Key to create it.
  3. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
  4. Enter the name NoFindFiles, then press Enter.
  5. Double-click the value, set it to 1, then click OK.
  6. Log off and log on for the change to take effect.

Q. How can I enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations?

A. You can configure a user's computer to enable or disable the ability to change file associations by performing the following steps:

  1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
  2. Navigate to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\policies\Explorer registry subkey to configure the computer for all users or navigate to the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies registry subkey to configure the computer for the current user. If either subkey doesn't exist, open the Edit menu and select New, Key to create it.
  3. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
  4. Enter the name NoFileAssociate.
  5. Set the value to 1 to disable the user's ability to change file associations (this setting doesn't affect Power Users and Administrators); a value of 0 or a missing value enables the user's ability to change file associations.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Close the registry editor.
  8. Restart the computer for the changes to take effect.

Q. How can I prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer's file types list in Windows 2000?

A. You can use Windows Explorer to view file types and modify file associations. To view the list of file types, open Windows Explorer; select Tools, Folder Options; then click the File Types tab. If you don't want Windows Explorer to display a certain file type (e.g., .txt), you need to modify the file-type's attributes in the registry. You can determine a file extension's file-type name by typing

assoc .

at the command prompt. For example, to determine the file-type name for the .txt extension, type

assoc .txt

and the computer will display

.txt=txtfile

To remove a file type from the Windows Explorer File Type dialog box, perform the following steps:

  1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
  2. Navigate to the HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ registry subkey.
  3. If a binary value doesn't exist, from the Edit menu select New, Binary Value; if a value of another data type (e.g., REG DWORD) exists, delete the existing value, then from the Edit menu select New, Binary Value.
  4. Enter the name EditFlags, then press Enter.
  5. Double-click the value, set it to 01 00 00 00, then click OK.

The change takes effect immediately, and Windows Explorer will no longer display the file type. To make the file type reappear so that the user can once again change it, either delete the EditFlags value or set it to 00 00 00 00.

Q. Why did my USB 1.1 devices stop working after I updated a driver for a USB 2.0 device?

A. This problem is a known issue with Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) and is caused when you use Device Manager to update the driver. To resolve the problem, restart the computer or open Device Manager, select the Action menu, then click Scan For Hardware Changes. Obviously, if you're using a USB mouse and keyboard, these devices will stop working, which might prevent you from cleanly shutting down your machine.

3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

  • HP OPENVIEW FOR WINDOWS TEST DRIVE

  • Monitor the availability and performance of your corporate website -- FREE for 30 days, using powerful HP OpenView management software for Windows. Simulate activity. Monitor complex transactions. Meet business demands. Manage web services. Click here.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/hptestdrive/

    4. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • JOIN THE HP & MICROSOFT NETWORK STORAGE SOLUTIONS ROAD SHOW!

  • Now is the time to start thinking of storage as a strategic weapon in your IT arsenal. Come to our 10-city Network Storage Solutions Road Show, and learn how existing and future storage solutions can save your company money--and make your job easier! There is no fee for this event, but space is limited. Register today!
    http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/nas

  • SAMPLE OUR SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR NEWSLETTER!

  • If you spend the better part of your day dealing with security concerns such as controlling user access, viruses, and tightening your network's permeability, then you can benefit from the type of information we publish each month in Security Administrator. Every issue shows you how to protect your enterprise with informative, in-depth articles, timely tips, and practical advice. Sample our most recent issue today!
    http://www.secadministrator.com/rd.cfm?code=fsei253xup

    5. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • ABOUT THE FAQS — jsavill@winnetmag.com
    • ABOUT THE NEWSLETTER IN GENERAL — warren@winnetmag.com

    (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)

    • TECHNICAL QUESTIONS — http://www.winnetmag.net/forums
    • PRODUCT NEWS — products@winnetmag.com
    • QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR WINDOWS XP AND 2000 TIPS & TRICKS UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION?
      Customer Support — tipsandtricks@winnetmag.com
    • WANT TO SPONSOR WINDOWS XP AND 2000 TIPS & TRICKS UPDATE?
      emedia_opps@winnetmag.com

    This weekly email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for Windows professionals who want to learn more and perform better. Subscribe today.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

    Receive the latest information about the Windows and .NET topics of your choice. Subscribe to our other FREE email newsletters.
    http://www.winnetmag.net/email

    Windows XP and 2000 Tips & Tricks UPDATE—brought to you by the Windows & .NET Magazine Network and the Windows 2000 FAQ site
    http://www.windowsitpro.com


    THIS ISSUE SPONSORED BY

    Port UNIX Applications to Windows Cost-effectively
    http://www.mkssoftware.com/products/tk/ds_tkedev.asp

    Wireless Technology Web Seminar
    http://www.winnetmag.com/seminars/rimwireless


    SPONSOR: PORT UNIX APPLICATIONS TO WINDOWS COST-EFFECTIVELY

    MKS Toolkit for Enterprise Developers (formerly NuTCRACKER) is the proven solution for porting robust, mission-critical UNIX applications to Windows! Port UNIX, C, C++ and Fortran applications to Windows easily, leveraging existing investments. Run UNIX applications as native Windows programs that take full advantage of COM, .Net and other Windows features. And, maintain a single source base across UNIX and Windows saving time and money for years to come. Call 800-637-8034; +1 (703) 803-3343 today and see why MKS Toolkit for Enterprise Developers should be your UNIX to Windows solution. Request a free 30 day Evaluation:
    http://www.mkssoftware.com/eval/default.asp?distrib=Win


    April 7, 2003—In this issue:

    1. COMMENTARY

    2. FAQS

    • Q. How can I view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express?
    • Q. How can I disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE)?
    • Q. How can I enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations?
    • Q. How can I prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer's file types list in Windows 2000?
    • Q. Why did my USB 1.1 devices stop working after I updated a driver for a USB 2.0 device?

    3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

    • OpenView for Windows Test Drive

    4. ANNOUNCEMENTS

    • Join The HP & Microsoft Network Storage Solutions Road Show!
    • Sample Our Security Administrator Newsletter!

    5. CONTACT US

    • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

    1. COMMENTARY
    (contributed by John Savill, FAQ Editor, jsavill@winnetmag.com)

    This week, I explain how to view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express, how to disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE), and how to enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations. I also tell you how to prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer and why some USB 1.1 devices might stop working after you update a USB 2.0 device driver.

    Around the industry this week, Microsoft released Windows Server 2003 to manufacturing and made the new OS available to Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) subscribers. To thank the many beta testers who provided feedback during the development process, Microsoft also made a time-limited trial version of the new OS available for download.

    Winternals, the people who create many great Windows utilities, has announced a new product called Recovery Manager (more information is available at the Winternals Web site). As the name implies, the software creates regular system snapshots that let you restore and recover key files and registry settings to get unstable and unbootable systems running as quickly as possible.


    SPONSOR: WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY WEB SEMINAR

    REGISTER NOW FOR OUR WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY WEB SEMINAR! Windows & .NET Magazine's newest Web seminar, sponsored by BlackBerry, covers what you need to know about wireless access and Exchange. Learn more about how to provide secure wireless access, what performance and scalability issues to watch out for, and what user issues you need to be prepared to handle as you roll out. There is no fee for this Web event, but space is limited. Register now!
    http://www.winnetmag.com/seminars/rimwireless


    2. FAQS

    Q. How can I view the source of a message in Microsoft Outlook Express?

    A. To view the message source within Outlook Express, perform the following steps:

    1. Open Outlook Express, right-click the message, then select Properties.
    2. Select the Details tab.
    3. Click Message Source.

    Alternatively, you can click the message and press Ctrl+F3.

    Q. How can I disable the F3 key search capability for Windows Explorer and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE)?

    A. To disable the F3 key search capability, perform the following steps:

    1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
    2. Navigate to the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Restrictions registry subkey. If this subkey doesn't exist, open the Edit menu and select New, Key to create it.
    3. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
    4. Enter the name NoFindFiles, then press Enter.
    5. Double-click the value, set it to 1, then click OK.
    6. Log off and log on for the change to take effect.

    Q. How can I enable or disable the user's ability to change file associations?

    A. You can configure a user's computer to enable or disable the ability to change file associations by performing the following steps:

    1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
    2. Navigate to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\policies\Explorer registry subkey to configure the computer for all users or navigate to the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies registry subkey to configure the computer for the current user. If either subkey doesn't exist, open the Edit menu and select New, Key to create it.
    3. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
    4. Enter the name NoFileAssociate.
    5. Set the value to 1 to disable the user's ability to change file associations (this setting doesn't affect Power Users and Administrators); a value of 0 or a missing value enables the user's ability to change file associations.
    6. Click OK.
    7. Close the registry editor.
    8. Restart the computer for the changes to take effect.

    Q. How can I prevent Windows from displaying a certain file type in Windows Explorer's file types list in Windows 2000?

    A. You can use Windows Explorer to view file types and modify file associations. To view the list of file types, open Windows Explorer; select Tools, Folder Options; then click the File Types tab. If you don't want Windows Explorer to display a certain file type (e.g., .txt), you need to modify the file-type's attributes in the registry. You can determine a file extension's file-type name by typing

    assoc .

    at the command prompt. For example, to determine the file-type name for the .txt extension, type

    assoc .txt

    and the computer will display

    .txt=txtfile

    To remove a file type from the Windows Explorer File Type dialog box, perform the following steps:

    1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
    2. Navigate to the HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ registry subkey.
    3. If a binary value doesn't exist, from the Edit menu select New, Binary Value; if a value of another data type (e.g., REG DWORD) exists, delete the existing value, then from the Edit menu select New, Binary Value.
    4. Enter the name EditFlags, then press Enter.
    5. Double-click the value, set it to 01 00 00 00, then click OK.

    The change takes effect immediately, and Windows Explorer will no longer display the file type. To make the file type reappear so that the user can once again change it, either delete the EditFlags value or set it to 00 00 00 00.

    Q. Why did my USB 1.1 devices stop working after I updated a driver for a USB 2.0 device?

    A. This problem is a known issue with Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) and is caused when you use Device Manager to update the driver. To resolve the problem, restart the computer or open Device Manager, select the Action menu, then click Scan For Hardware Changes. Obviously, if you're using a USB mouse and keyboard, these devices will stop working, which might prevent you from cleanly shutting down your machine.

    3. HOT RELEASE (ADVERTISEMENT)

  • HP OPENVIEW FOR WINDOWS TEST DRIVE

  • Monitor the availability and performance of your corporate website -- FREE for 30 days, using powerful HP OpenView management software for Windows. Simulate activity. Monitor complex transactions. Meet business demands. Manage web services. Click here.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/hptestdrive/

    4. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • JOIN THE HP & MICROSOFT NETWORK STORAGE SOLUTIONS ROAD SHOW!

  • Now is the time to start thinking of storage as a strategic weapon in your IT arsenal. Come to our 10-city Network Storage Solutions Road Show, and learn how existing and future storage solutions can save your company money--and make your job easier! There is no fee for this event, but space is limited. Register today!
    http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/nas

  • SAMPLE OUR SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR NEWSLETTER!

  • If you spend the better part of your day dealing with security concerns such as controlling user access, viruses, and tightening your network's permeability, then you can benefit from the type of information we publish each month in Security Administrator. Every issue shows you how to protect your enterprise with informative, in-depth articles, timely tips, and practical advice. Sample our most recent issue today!
    http://www.secadministrator.com/rd.cfm?code=fsei253xup

    5. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • ABOUT THE FAQS — jsavill@winnetmag.com
    • ABOUT THE NEWSLETTER IN GENERAL — warren@winnetmag.com

    (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)

    • TECHNICAL QUESTIONS — http://www.winnetmag.net/forums
    • PRODUCT NEWS — products@winnetmag.com
    • QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR WINDOWS XP AND 2000 TIPS & TRICKS UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION?
      Customer Support — tipsandtricks@winnetmag.com
    • WANT TO SPONSOR WINDOWS XP AND 2000 TIPS & TRICKS UPDATE?
      emedia_opps@winnetmag.com

    This weekly email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for Windows professionals who want to learn more and perform better. Subscribe today.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

    Receive the latest information about the Windows and .NET topics of your choice. Subscribe to our other FREE email newsletters.
    http://www.winnetmag.net/email