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Questions (January 18, 2002)
Answers (January 18, 2002)

This week's questions cover topics for Exam 70-210: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional.

Questions (January 18, 2002)

Question 1
Jim wants to track the use of his Windows 2000 Professional machine because he suspects that someone is logging on at night and accessing some of his confidential files. Using local Group Policy on his computer, he enables auditing for the object Access. However, when he tries to specify which files and folders to audit, he can't find an option to configure auditing. Which of the following is the most likely reason why Jim can't properly set up auditing on his computer?

  1. Auditing of process tracking isn't enabled; to track system activity such as file access, Jim must enable process tracking.
  2. Auditing is enabled at the local level; Jim must enable auditing at the domain level.
  3. The drive that Jim wants to audit isn't NTFS formatted; Jim must format the drive with NTFS before he can implement auditing.
  4. Jim must restart his system before he can enable auditing.

Question 2
You installed Windows 2000 Professional, Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4 (SP4), and Windows 95 on a computer for testing purposes. You created partitions and placed Win95 on the C drive, NT Workstation 4.0 on the D drive, and Win2K Pro on the E drive. You also created an F drive on which you want to store data that you can access from all OSs. You want to implement individual file security for data on the D drive and enforce disk quotas for data on the E drive. Which of the following scenarios represents the best file systems to use for each of the partitions? (Choose the best answer.)

  1. FAT32 on C, NTFS on D, FAT on E, FAT32 on F
  2. NTFS on C, FAT32 on D, FAT on E, NTFS on F
  3. FAT on C, FAT32 on D, NTFS on E, FAT on F
  4. FAT on C, NTFS on D, NTFS on E, FAT on F
  5. NTFS on C, NTFS on D, NTFS on E, FAT on D
  6. FAT32 on C, NTFS on D, FAT32 on E, NTFS on F

Question 3
Performance on your Windows 2000 system has become sluggish. As part of the troubleshooting process, you want to use System Monitor to view the performance of some resource usage and system activity tracking counters. When you try to collect logical-disk data for your system, you can't. What's the most likely reason for that you can't collect and view logical-disk data on a Win2K Professional computer?

  1. You can't view logical-disk data on a Win2K Pro computer; viewing logical-disk data is limited to Win2K Servers.
  2. For security purposes, the default local policy for a Win2K Pro machine prevents the viewing of logical-disk data. You must enable the logical-disk counter through the local policy editor.
  3. The OS can't collect logical-disk counter data. However, the OS can collect physical-disk data, and you should use this data to determine disk activity.
  4. By default, the OS doesn't collect logical-disk counter data. To enable collection of logical-disk counter data, you must run a command on your system.

Answers (January 18, 2002)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answer is C—The drive that Jim wants to audit isn't NTFS formatted; Jim must format the drive with NTFS before he can implement auditing. To set up permissions and auditing for files and folders, you must use NTFS drives. You can't implement auditing on FAT or FAT32 drives.

Answer to Question 2
The correct answer is D—FAT on C, NTFS on D, NTFS on E, FAT on F. The following OSs support the following file systems:

Win95: FAT (later releases provide support for FAT32)
NT Workstation 4.0: FAT, NTFS
Win2K Pro: FAT, FAT32, NTFS

To boot multiple OSs successfully, your machine must have a common partition that all the OSs can access—and in most cases, this partition is the C drive. To provide support for file and folder security in Win2K Pro and NT Workstation 4.0, you must format their drives with NTFS. Also, Win2K Pro requires NTFS to provide support for disk quotas.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answer is D—By default, the OS doesn't collect logical-disk counter data. To enable collection of logical-disk counter data, you must run a command on your system.

To obtain performance counter data for logical drives or storage volumes, you must type the following command at a command prompt:

diskperf -yv

This command causes the disk performance statistics driver used for collecting disk performance data to report data for logical drives or storage volumes. By default, the OS uses the diskperf -yd command to obtain physical-drive data.