Microsoft and Oracle announced on Monday that the two firms are entering into a partnership that will bring Oracle’s database and other applications to Hyper-V and Windows Azure. Additionally, Microsoft will offer Java and Oracle Linux on Windows Azure.

“Microsoft is deeply committed to giving businesses what they need, and clearly that is the ability to run enterprise workloads in private clouds, public clouds and, increasingly, across both,” Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer says. “Now our customers will be able to take advantage of the flexibility our unique hybrid cloud solutions offer for their Oracle applications, middleware, and databases, just like they have been able to do on Windows Server for years."

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“At Oracle, we are committed to providing greater choice and flexibility to customers by providing multiple deployment options for our software, including on-premises, as well as public, private, and hybrid clouds,” Oracle President Mark Hurd added. “This collaboration with Microsoft extends our partnership and is important for the benefit of our customers.”

Terms of the deal weren't disclosed. But the firms promised to achieve the following:

  • Customers can run supported Oracle software on Windows Server Hyper-V and in Windows Azure today.
  • Oracle is providing license mobility for customers who want to run Oracle software on Windows Azure today.
  • Microsoft will add Infrastructure Services instances with popular configurations of Oracle software, including Java, Oracle Database, and Oracle WebLogic Server to the Windows Azure [VM] image gallery.
  • Microsoft will offer fully licensed and supported Java in Windows Azure.
  • Oracle will offer Oracle Linux, with a variety of Oracle software, as preconfigured instances on Windows Azure.

Although the notion of Microsoft supporting, let alone selling, Oracle software solutions would have been unthinkable just a few months ago, Mr. Baller said that this new age of cloud computing required the firms to work together in “constructive” new ways.

Plus, the announcement wasn’t a huge surprise: Oracle CEO Larry Ellison basically telegraphed this partnership in a conference call last week, adding that similar deals with Salesforce.com and NetSuite are in the works, as well.

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