Exchange and Outlook UPDATE, Outlook Edition—brought to you by Exchange & Outlook Administrator, a print newsletter from Windows & .NET Magazine that contains practical advice, how-to articles, tips, and techniques to help you do your job today.
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(below COMMENTARY)


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September 3, 2002—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • Form Spy Tools

2. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Take Our Exchange Survey and Enter to Win a Microsoft Xbox!
  • Mobile and Wireless Solutions—An Online Resource for a New Era

3. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Take Our Exchange Survey and Enter to Win a Microsoft Xbox!
  • Mobile and Wireless Solutions--An Online Resource for a New Era

4. RESOURCE

  • Tip: Sending a Copy of a Message to a Specific Folder

5. NEW AND IMPROVED

  • Use Email Messages to Create a Web Site

6. CONTACT US

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by Sue Mosher, News Editor, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • FORM SPY TOOLS

  • This Commentary is the third in a series about Outlook forms architecture and management. The first two covered Outlook's MessageClass property and Forms Manager tool. This time, we'll look at two other tools that can help you explore the locations where Outlook stores forms.

    You probably already know that you can publish custom Outlook forms to three locations—the Personal Forms library, the Organizational Forms library for the Exchange Server system, and any folder's forms library. For the Organizational Forms library, you need permission to create items. For a public folder's forms library, you need Owner permission.

    Forms reside as hidden items in hidden folders, but tools such as Mdbvu32 (mdbvu32.exe on the Exchange CD-ROM) and OutlookSpy can help bring them to light. I personally prefer OutlookSpy, which is easier to use and has more features than Mdbvu32.

    First, let's locate the Personal Forms library, which is in a hidden folder in the user's default information store. To use Mdbvu32, start the program; accept the default NULL logon parameter; choose MDB, Open Message Store; and choose the store marked with a D for default. In most cases, that store is the user's Exchange mailbox. Choose MDB, Open Root Folder. In the Child Folders list, double-click Common Views. Look in the Associated Messages in Fld list for the Common Views hidden folder. You should see a list of views and other items that begin with "cb: 40." The other items are custom-form definitions. You can double-click any form to view its properties in Mdbvu32.

    To use OutlookSpy, click the IMsgStore button on the OutlookSpy toolbar in Outlook. In the IMsgStore dialog box, click Open Root Container. In the IMAPIFolder dialog box that appears next, select the GetHierarchyTable tab, then double-click Common Views, which will appear in a new IMAPIFolder window. Select the Associated Contents tab, and you'll see several rows labeled IPM.Microsoft.FolderDesign.FormDescription. These are the custom forms. As in Mdbvu32, you can double-click any form to see its properties in detail.

    Don't try to modify any of the form properties. The ones that distinguish a form from an Outlook data item are largely undocumented, and many are binary. You can't edit the form definition to change the location of a particular control on the form, for example. You can, however, delete a form. In Mdbvu32, select the form from the Associated Messages in Fld list, choose lpdFld->DeleteMessages() from the drop-down function list, then click Call Function. In OutlookSpy, select a form in the Associated Contents list, then click Delete.

    Now that you know how to locate the Personal Forms library, you can hunt for the other forms libraries. Mdbvu32 shows the forms published to any Outlook folder in the Associated Messages in Fld list for the folder; OutlookSpy shows them on the Associated Contents tab for the folder.

    To locate the Organizational Forms library with Mdbvu32, go back to the MDB View Test Application dialog box (Mdbvu32's main window) and choose Store Logoff to start over with a new information store. Choose MDB, Open Message Store and pick Public Folders from the store list. Choose MDB, Open Root Folder. Double-click NON_IPM_SUBTREE, EFORMS REGISTRY, Organizational Forms.

    In OutlookSpy, select any public folder in Outlook, then click the IMsgStore button on the OutlookSpy toolbar. Click Open Root Container, then select the Get Hierarchy Table tab in the IMAPIFolder dialog box that pops up. Double-click the NON_IPM_SUBTREE entry. On the next dialog box's Get Hierarchy Table tab, double-click EFORMS REGISTRY. Select the Get Hierarchy Table tab of the last dialog box, and you should see Organizational Forms. Forms published to that library appear on its Associated Contents tab.

    Understanding that Outlook stores form definitions in hidden folders helps explain one problem that often occurs when you use a tool such as ExMerge to export mailbox data to a Personal Folders (.pst) file, then import it into a new mailbox. This process handles only the visible data items in the mailbox--it doesn't transfer the custom forms stored in the Personal Folders library or in folder forms libraries. Before moving the user's data, you can use the Forms Manager, as described in "Using Outlook's Forms Manager," August 20, 2002, to back up and restore the forms.


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    2. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • TAKE OUR EXCHANGE SURVEY AND ENTER TO WIN A MICROSOFT XBOX!

  • We need your opinion! Take our brief survey on managing Microsoft Exchange Server with third-party tools, and we'll automatically enter your name into a drawing for a Microsoft Xbox. Click here to start the survey!
    http://www.zoomerang.com/survey.zgi?1ax4vkr1q8a55gj12hdhw5Ja

  • MOBILE AND WIRELESS SOLUTIONS--AN ONLINE RESOURCE FOR A NEW ERA

  • Our mobile and wireless computing site has it all--technical articles, product reviews, forums, and other resources to help you support a wireless network and mobile users. Check it out today!
    http://www.mobile-and-wireless.com

    3. RESOURCE
    (contributed by Sue Mosher, olupdate@slipstick.com)

  • TIP: SENDING A COPY OF A MESSAGE TO A SPECIFIC FOLDER


  • Q: How can I send or Cc a message to a folder I've created in my Exchange Server mailbox?

    A: You can send a message to a public folder because public folders can have mail addresses. However, folders in your mailbox don't have individual mail addresses. To make an outgoing message file go into a particular folder in your mailbox, use one of these methods:
    • Before you send the message, click Options and change the "Save sent message to" folder.
    • Set up a Rules Wizard rule to file copies of outgoing messages to folders, according to criteria you define.
    • After you send the message, drag it from Sent Items to the target folder. If you want to leave a copy in Sent Items, hold down the Ctrl key as you drag the item.

    See the Exchange & Outlook Administrator Web site for more great tips from Sue Mosher.
    http://www.exchangeadmin.com

    4. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, products@winnetmag.com)

  • USE EMAIL MESSAGES TO CREATE A WEB SITE

  • Mia Interact announced Witsites, a service that lets you use email messages to create and maintain a Web site. Create an email message that looks the way you want your site to look--insert pictures, use different fonts for headlines and text--then send the message to your Web site. Witsites' mail>to>site technology transforms any content you send in your email to Web site content. The service costs $19.95 per year and supports Outlook, AOL, Eudora, and Netscape Messenger email applications. Contact Mia Interact at service@witsites.com.
    http://www.witsites.com

    5. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • ABOUT THE COMMENTARY — olupdate@slipstick.com
    • ABOUT THE NEWSLETTER IN GENERAL — rmunshi@winnetmag.com
      (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)
    • TECHNICAL QUESTIONS — http://www.winnetmag.net/forums
    • PRODUCT NEWS — products@winnetmag.com
    • QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR Exchange and Outlook UPDATE SUBSCRIPTION?
      Customer Support — winnetmagupdate@winnetmag.com

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